The Message

One of my contemporary “heros” of the faith is Eugene Peterson. First, the guy really walks with God! Although I have never met him personally, it is so evident in his writings that his life is completely given over to becoming like the Savior who loves him. Second, the guy’s a genius. He is a brilliant Greek and Hebrew scholar. Having swam in the shallows of those biblical languages, I know how much time and energy has to be given to master them. Third, the guy is a pastor’s pastor. He has pastored the same church for over thirty years, resisting the contemporary fads of church growth, marketing, seeker-sensitivity, programming and all the other crap that John Drane calls the “McDonaldization of the Church.” (More on that another time.)

So when I read his preface in The Message this morning, I was deeply moved. Here is a man who has walked with God, God’s Word and God’s people with incredible integrity. And the result is this rich and beautiful text. And like anything, there’s always a story. I’ve included the entire preface below so you too can read the story behind this man, the God he loves, and the Message his life revolves around:

“If there is anything distinctive about The Message, perhaps it is because the text is shaped by the hand of a working pastor. For most of my adult life I have been given a primary responsibility for getting the message of the Bible into the lives of men and women with whom I worked. I did it from pulpit and lectern, in home Bible studies and at mountain retreats, through conversations in hospitals and nursing homes, over coffee in kitchens and while strolling on an ocean beach. The Message grew from the soil of forty years of pastoral work.

“As I worked at this task, this Word of God, which forms and transforms human lives, did form and transform human lives. Planted in the soil of my congregation and community the seed words of the Bible germinated and grew and matured. When it came time to do the work which is now The Message, I often felt that I was walking through an orchard at harvest time, plucking fully formed apples and peaches and plums from laden branches. There’s hardly a page in the Bible I did not see lived in some way or other by the men and women, saints and sinners, to whom I was a pastor—and then verified in my nation and culture.

“I didn’t start out as a pastor. I began my vocational life as a teacher and for several years taught the biblical languages of Hebrew and Greek in a theological seminary. I expected to live the rest of my life as a professor and scholar, teaching and writing and studying. But then my life took a sudden vocational turn to pastoring in a congregation.

“I was now plunged into quite a different world. The first noticeable difference was that nobody seemed to care much about the Bible, which so recently people had been paying me to teach them. Many of the people I worked with now knew virtually nothing about it, had never read it, and weren’t interested in learning. Many others had spent years reading it but for them it had gone flat through familiarity, reduced to clichés. Bored, they dropped it. And there weren’t many people in between. Very few were interested in what I considered my primary work, getting the words of the Bible into their heads and hearts, getting the message lived. They found newspapers and magazines, videos and pulp fiction more to their taste.

“Meanwhile I had taken on as my life work the responsibility of getting these very people to listen, really listen, to the message in this book. I knew I had my work cut out for me.

“I lived in two language worlds, the world of the Bible and the world of Today. I had always assumed they were the same world. But these people didn’t see it that way. So out of necessity I became a “translator” (although I wouldn’t have called it that then), daily standing on the border between two worlds, getting the language of the Bible that God used to create and save us, heal and bless us, judge and rule over us, into the language of Today that we use to gossip and tell stories, give directions and do business, sing songs and talk to our children.

“And all the time those old biblical languages, those powerful and vivid Hebrew and Greek originals, kept working their way underground in my speech, giving energy and sharpness to words and phrases, expanding the imagination of the people with whom I was working to hear the language of the Bible in the language of Today and the language of Today in the language of the Bible.

“I did that for thirty years in one congregation. And then one day (it was April 30, 1990) I got a letter from an editor asking me to work on a new version of the Bible along the lines of what I had been doing as a pastor. I agreed. The next ten years were harvest time. The Message is the result.

The Message is a reading Bible. It is not intended to replace the excellent study Bibles that are available. My intent here (as it was earlier in my congregation and community) is simply to get people reading it who don’t know that the Bible is read–able at all, at least by them, and to get people who long ago lost interest in the Bible to read it again. I leave out verse numbers to encourage unimpeded reading (no Bibles had verse numbers for the first 1,500 years). But I haven’t tried to make it easy—there is much in the Bible that is hard to understand. So at some point along the way, soon or late, it will be important to get a standard study Bible to facilitate further study. Meanwhile, read in order to live, praying as you read, ‘God, let it be with me just as you say.'”

4 thoughts on “The Message

  1. Jason, Your mother will wash your mouth out with soap. Control those fingers of yours. The word C— , well I just dont know what to say. NOW do you fell condemed. Sorry. Dad

  2. Hey Babe, You are one of my heroes. (even though you used the “C” word I can completely understand why now that I have talked with you and read your post.) You are my hero because you took a stand against all that was wrong with the church even though it ripped your heart out to leave. You are my hero because I see the maturity and growth in you as you have been walking with God all these years. I see you reading piles of books (including the bible of course) and articles and blogs looking for new insight into God’s kingdom and character because you are not one to sit contentedly by waiting for someone to say well done, now you may rest. You are driven to know God and I hope that that gets transfered to our children. You are my hero because you have great integrity in hard circumstances. I love you and feel blessed to be your wife. Love, Debbie

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