The Justice Bra, part 1

I was shocked by the statistics she stated that cotton is the most pesticide-dependent crop and that every t-shirt made of conventional cotton requires a quarter pound of harmful chemicals. As a family of six trying to live on a very limited income, living justly is a very difficult endeavor for us. For example, purchasing new clothes at Walmart or used clothes at thrift stores is almost necessary for us. This reminds me of the “saga” Lisa Samson blogged about as she searched for fair trade capris in an attempt to shop justly.

Julie Clawson has written an interesting article called, “My Search for the Justice Bra, part 1,” over at God’s Politics. It captures some of the obstacles that a person faces who is attempting to live and consume ethically. I was shocked by the statistics she stated that cotton is the most pesticide-dependent crop and that every t-shirt made of conventional cotton requires a quarter pound of harmful chemicals.As a family of six trying to live on a very limited income, living justly is a very difficult endeavor for us. For example, purchasing new clothes at Walmart or used clothes at thrift stores is almost necessary for us. This reminds me of the “saga” Lisa Samson blogged about as she searched for fair trade capris in an attempt to shop justly. She ended finding a pair for $49. Here was her dilemma:

“The big problem? The price. $59 for the cropped twills, $49 for the trousers. I like the trousers better and if I go this route, I’ll probably order these. So here’s the thing. Yes, it’s all fair trade, but isn’t $49 for a stinkin’ pair of pants a lot of money? Surely there are better options for me, price-wise. In the comments yesterday, Alana mentioned thrift stores. And while I really want to support the whole fair trade thing, and maybe you do too, what if we just can’t afford clothing at these prices. For years I’ve been a Target shopper and I almost always buy my clothes at the back of the department where they are clumped together on the sale rack. Shoot, for the Christys, my entire outfit, shoes, jewelry and all, came to $51. That’s Target for you. So to pay for one pair of pants what I paid for an entire outfit, shoes and all, just puts a lump in my throat.”

No one said a lifestyle of justice would be easy… or inexpensive.Lisa’s solution was to mend her current pair of capris. I’m looking forward to the conclusion of Julie’s story that should be posted on Monday, July 30.Also, on a similar topic, Mars Hill Church is doing a sermon series called “God is Green.” It’s worth checking out, especially the sermon called “Serve God, Save the Planet” by guest speaker, Matthew Sleeth.

One thought on “The Justice Bra, part 1

  1. I heard Matthew Sleeth’s lecture about Global Warming at a church in Santa Monica and read Lisa’s article about pursuing justice by purchasing only Fair Trade clothing. Both were honest about the sacrifices that need to be made, but also the importance of making those sacrifices. I’m curious to check out the Justice Bra article – thanks for the link!

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